Recent Publications & Media Coverage

 

 

Article in The Evening Echo on 9th September 2016

- Interview with Trish Cameron, Temple of Éiriú celebrant

 

 

© 2015 Temple of Éiriú. All rights reserved.

​Exert from article:  

 

"According to the Humanist Association of Ireland, just 12 humanist funerals took place in Ireland in 2007 and this increased to 121 in 2014.

 

For those who wish to opt for a non-denominational funeral but one spiritual in its basis, Wicklow-based registered celebrant Trish Cameron, from the spiritual community Temple of Éiriu, can provide just that. With over 20 years training in the Irish and Native American spiritual traditions, Trish says that people are increasingly looking for alternatives to the traditional funeral.

 

“Overall, there is a shift in our culture,” she said. “The sway or hold that religion had is dissipating and people are thinking ‘What do I believe?’ rather than what they were taught. A person might not want a religious ceremony but they may want something spiritual because they believe that the soul travels on.

 

I collect the jewels of a person’s life, the jewels being what they loved and were connected to and what made them come alive in life. As for the funeral itself, it’s the same protocol but without the church or religion. It’s very important to a family that they feel their loved one’s life has been celebrated with respect and honour, which helps with the whole grieving and healing process.”

 

The funeral home is used for both religious and non-denominational ceremonies. Kevin O’Connor says that the modern funeral is tailored towards the wishes of the deceased and their family. “We, as funeral directors and as a society are much more open,“ he said. “I think we’ve become more tolerant of other people’s beliefs and their ideas about how they would like things done. It’s like everything. Times change and we change along with it.”

 

 

​Exert from article:  

 

"According to the Humanist Association of Ireland, just 12 humanist funerals took place in Ireland in 2007 and this increased to 121 in 2014.

 

For those who wish to opt for a non-denominational funeral but one spiritual in its basis, Wicklow-based registered celebrant Trish Cameron, from the spiritual community Temple of Éiriu, can provide just that. With over 20 years training in the Irish and Native American spiritual traditions, Trish says that people are increasingly looking for alternatives to the traditional funeral.

 

“Overall, there is a shift in our culture,” she said. “The sway or hold that religion had is dissipating and people are thinking ‘What do I believe?’ rather than what they were taught. A person might not want a religious ceremony but they may want something spiritual because they believe that the soul travels on.

 

I collect the jewels of a person’s life, the jewels being what they loved and were connected to and what made them come alive in life. As for the funeral itself, it’s the same protocol but without the church or religion. It’s very important to a family that they feel their loved one’s life has been celebrated with respect and honour, which helps with the whole grieving and healing process.”

 

The funeral home is used for both religious and non-denominational ceremonies. Kevin O’Connor says that the modern funeral is tailored towards the wishes of the deceased and their family. “We, as funeral directors and as a society are much more open,“ he said. “I think we’ve become more tolerant of other people’s beliefs and their ideas about how they would like things done. It’s like everything. Times change and we change along with it.”

 
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